237 Parallels

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This page forms part of the resources for 237 Distant Girl Cured in the Jesus Database project of FaithFutures Foundation

Crossan Inventory | 237 Literature | 237 Parallels | 237 Commentary | 237 Poetry | 237 Synopsis | 237 Images


Parallels

Clementine literature picks up the figure of "Justa", identified as the Canaanite woman whose daughter was healed by Jesus.

Chapter XIX. — Justa, a Proselyte.


“There is amongst us one Justa, a Syro-Phoenician, by race a Canaanite, whose daughter was oppressed with a grievous disease. And she came to our Lord, crying out, and entreating that He would heal her daughter. But He, being asked also by us, said, ‘It is not lawful to heal the Gentiles, who are like to dogs on account of their using various meats and practices, while the table in the kingdom has been given to the sons of Israel.’ But she, hearing this, and begging to partake like a dog of the crumbs that fall from this table, having changed what she was, by living like the sons of the kingdom, she obtained healing for her daughter, as she asked. For she being a Gentile, and remaining in the same course of life, He would not have healed had she remained a Gentile, on account of its not being lawful to heal her as a Gentile.

Chapter XX. — Divorced for the Faith.

“She, therefore, having taken up a manner of life according to the law, was, with the daughter who had been healed, driven out from her home by her husband, whose sentiments were opposed to ours. But she, being faithful to her engagements, and being in affluent circumstances, remained a widow herself, but gave her daughter in marriage to a certain man who was attached to the true faith, and who was poor. And, abstaining from marriage for the sake of her daughter, she bought two boys and educated them, and had them in place of sons. And they being educated from their boyhood with Simon Magus, have learned all things concerning him. For such was their friendship, that they were associated with him in all things in which he wished to unite with them.

[Homilies II, 19-20. Alexander Roberts, James Donaldson, and A. Cleveland Coxe, eds., The Twelve Patriarchs, Excerpts and Epistles, the Clementia, Apocrypha, Decretals, Memoirs of Edessa and Syriac Documents, Remains of the First Ages (ANF VIII; Accordance electronic ed. 9 vols.; New York: Christian Literature Company, 1885), n.p.]